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Language
Jill Mazurkiewicz

            There are more than 170 different languages spoken in the Philippines and the majority of them are of Austronesian descent.  It is one of the largest language families in the world.  The two national languages are Filipino and English.  Most people in the Philippines consider Filipino essentially and practically the same language as Tagalog. It is more likely that Filipinos ask others if they know how to speak Tagalog rather than if they know how to speak Filipino.  From my research, I have found that Filipinos like to reserve that name for their heritage, not the name of their language.  It is essentially the same if one would ask a native of the U.S.A what language they speak.  They would not typically respond, “I speak American” but they would instead say English.

English

            English is the dominant language in business, government, the legal system, medicine, and education. Filipinos would much rather have their text books written in English rather than Filipino because it is much easier to comprehend and also is much more useful in the “real world”.  At home however, most speak their dialects. English brings along with it a sense of formality and almost everyone can understand the language.  Even in the most remote areas of the Philippines, the elder generations of people can still understand English. 

 

Tagalog

            Tagalog is widely spoken in the Phillipines.  The national language, Filipino, is derived from Tagalog.  The Tagalog alphabet has five vowels and fifteen consonants.  

Tagalog alphabet - A B K D E G H I L M N Ng O P R S T U W Y 

Panggalatók

Panggalatók is spoken exclusively in the province of Pangasinan.  It is considered one of the most complex and difficult of the Philippine languages. Learning the language is even more difficult because hardly anything is written in the language. 


 

 

English

Tagalog

Panggalatok

one

isa

sakey

two

dalawa

duwara

three

tatlo

talora

four

apat

apatira

five

lima

limara

six

anim

anemira

seven

pito

pitora

eight

walo

walo

nine

siyam

siyamira

ten

sampu

samplura

 

 

Taglish

Taglish is an informal dialect that is widely spoken in the Philippines.  Most Filipinos speak English as well as their own dialect and thus it is very common to merge the two languages into one when speaking.  While I was conducting my interview, I witnessed this first hand.  My friend had become so comfortable with me and the interview that she unknowingly began merging English and Tagalog into the own unique language of Taglish.

 

 

  

 

Interview with Filipino-American, Luisa Asuncion

 


Continue to Religion

 

References

“Philippines History Index.”  2001. April 13 2005

            http://workmall.com/wfb2001/philippines/philippines_history_index.html

 

“Philippines.” 2005. April 13 2005 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippines

 

“Major languages of the Philippines.”  April 8. 2005  

http://www.csun.edu/~lan56728/majorlanguages.htm

 

Steinberg, David Joel. The Philippines: A Singular and A Plural Place. Boulder:

Westview Press, 1982.

Interview with Ma Luisa Asuncion on April 16, 2005